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STUDENT-PARENT HANDBOOK


STUDENT-PARENT HANDBOOK
2010 - 2011

Stuart Hall for Boys
2 2 5 2 B R O A D W A Y S A N F R A N C I S C O 9 4 1 1 5 SWITCHBOARD STUART HALL OFFICE FAX SHB ATHLETIC OFFICE

(415) (415) (415) (415) (415) 563-2900 292-3143 292-3144 292-3165 292-3105

Use the switchboard to contact teachers and for after school service. Use the SH office to speak to the administrative assistants.
Student-Parent Handbook 2010-2011

Table of Contents
MISSION AND PHILOSPOHY ........................................................................................................1 FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION ...............................................................................................2 I. HISTORY & TRADITION ........................................................................................................3 SOCIETY OF THE SACRED HEART ................................................................................................3 RELIGIOUS HERITAGE ..................................................................................................................4 SCHOOL ORGANIZATION .............................................................................................................4 ACCREDITATION...........................................................................................................................4 TRADITIONS ..................................................................................................................................5 II. PHILOSPOHY OF EDUCATION ..........................................................................................6
GOALS & CRITERIA .......................................................................................................................6 PARENT-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP ..................................................................................................6 MUTUAL RESPECT .........................................................................................................................7

III. GENERAL POLICIES ............................................................................................................7 CONTRACTS..................................................................................................................................7 FINANCIAL AID ............................................................................................................................7 ATTENDANCE ...............................................................................................................................8 ABSENCES .....................................................................................................................................9 TARDNIESS ....................................................................................................................................9 EXTENDED VACATIONS ................................................................................................................9 PROCEDURES FOR REQUESTING EXCUSED EXTENDED ABSENCES ..............................................9 COMMUNITY SERVICE ................................................................................................................10 MISSION: ..............................................................................................................................10 VISION:.................................................................................................................................10 GROWTH: .............................................................................................................................10 METAMORPHOSIS ................................................................................................................10 PROPOSALS FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECTS ..................................................................10 BIRTHDAYS .................................................................................................................................11 HOUSE & BABY SITTING ............................................................................................................11 VISITORS & GUESTS ...................................................................................................................11 MAKE UP WORK ........................................................................................................................11 PARENT ABSENCES ....................................................................................................................12 UNIFORM ....................................................................................................................................12 LUNCH ........................................................................................................................................12 LOCKERS, DESKS & CUBBIES .....................................................................................................12 LOST & FOUND ..........................................................................................................................12 COMMUNICATIONS & ELECTRONIC DEVICES ..........................................................................13 TELEPHONES & MESSAGES: ................................................................................................13 PAGERS & CELLULAR PHONES:..........................................................................................13 ELECTRONIC GAMES: ..........................................................................................................13 TOYS, WEAPONS OR THE APPERANCE THEREOF .....................................................................13 HANDBOOK CHANGES ..............................................................................................................13 IV. THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM ............................................................................................13
Student- Parent Handbook 2009-2010

HOMEROOMS, CURRICULUM & SCHEDULES ............................................................................................ 13 STUDENT COUNCIL ................................................................................................................................... 14 BOOKS & MATERIALS................................................................................................................................ 14 HOMEWORK POLICY .................................................................................................................................. 14 ORIGINALITY OF ONE'S WORK....................................................................................................................17 ACHIEVEMENT GRADES ............................................................................................................................ 20 ACADEMIC HONORS ................................................................................................................................. 20 STUDY NOTICES......................................................................................................................................... 20 HOMEWORK CLUB .................................................................................................................................... 20 ONE-MONTH NOTICES ............................................................................................................................. 20 E.R.B.S....................................................................................................................................................... 21 CONFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................... 21 CO-CURRICULAR & EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ............................................................................ 21 DESTINATION IMMAGINATION ................................................................................................................. 21 CHILD STUDY TEAM (CST)....................................................................................................................... 22 TUTORING.................................................................................................................................................. 22 SCHOOL COUNSELOR ................................................................................................................................ 22 EXPLORATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 23 PROMOTION & GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................................ 23 SECONDARY SCHOOL PLACEMENT .......................................................................................................... 23 LOWER FORM ............................................................................................................................................ 24 RECEPTION OF FIRST RECONCILIATION & FIRST COMMUNION:....................................................... 24 UNIFORM DESCRIPTIONS:................................................................................................................... 24 PHILOSOPHY OF LOWER FORM DISCIPLINE: ...................................................................................... 25 MIDDLE FORM ........................................................................................................................................... 26 PHILOSOPHY OF MIDDLE FORM DISCIPLINE: .................................................................................... 26 ADVISORY: .......................................................................................................................................... 27 UNIFORM DESCRIPTION: .................................................................................................................... 27 EXAMINATIONS (GRADES 7-8): .......................................................................................................... 28 REPORTS: ............................................................................................................................................. 28 ACADEMIC PROBATION:..................................................................................................................... 29 NOTICE OF SUSPENSION: .................................................................................................................... 29 DISCIPLINARY PROBATION:................................................................................................................ 29 SCHOOL SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................ 29 SERIOUS ALLEGATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 29 BULLYING .................................................................................................................................................. 29 ATHLETIC HAND BOOK .............................................................................................................................. 30 V. SHARED PROGRAMS OF SCHOOLS OF THE SACRED HEART............................................... 38 THE ELLEN HOFFMAN, RSCJ LIBRARY .................................................................................................... 38 CIRCULATION POLICIES:..................................................................................................................... 38 INFORMATION LITERACY CURRICULUM:........................................................................................... 38 STUDENT EXPECTATIONS: .................................................................................................................. 38 AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM IN THE LIBRARY: ..................................................................................... 38 BIRTHDAY & GIFT BOOK PROGRAM: ................................................................................................. 39 AFTER SCHOOL & EXTENSION .................................................................................................................. 39 THE UNKEFER TECHNOLOGY LAB ........................................................................................................... 39 VI. HEALTH AND SAFETY....................................................................................................................... 40 VII. EMERGENCY GUIDELINES ............................................................................................................ 42 INDEX .......................................................................................................................................................... 45

Student- Parent Handbook 2009-2010

Mission and Philosophy Founded in 1887 as an independent, Catholic school, Schools of the Sacred Heart, San Francisco carries on the educational mission of the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. We share with the other members of the nationwide Network of Sacred Heart Schools five common goals and the commitment to educate to: ? a personal and active faith in God; ? a deep respect for intellectual values; ? a social awareness which impels to action; ? the building of community as a Christian value; ? personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom. A Kindergarten – 12, four-school complex, Schools of the Sacred Heart, San Francisco offer the unique experience of single-sex education within a coeducational community. Students are expected to achieve their highest level of scholarship while learning to assume leadership roles as responsible, compassionate, and contributing members of society. Introduction Communication is a critical component of the parent-school partnership. The purpose of this handbook is to outline a number of the salient policies and procedures that explain how the school operates. As you read this handbook, please keep in mind that the Handbook does not intend to cover all aspects of daily life at Stuart Hall for Boys. Faculty and Administration 2010-2011 Jaime Dominguez Dennis Phillips Angela Taylor Support Jan Hanway Jennifer Mills Mary Kay Leveroni Alice Rose Mary Beth Cecchini Paul Harvey Abigail Gould Myra Alcaide Counselor Explorations Learning Specialist, Lower Form Learning Specialist, Middle Form Learning Support Assistant Director of Athletics Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant Head of School Dean, Middle Form Dean, Lower Form

Lower Form Faculty Lauren Goodrich Kindergarten (K-G) Adelaide Goldfrank Associate (K-G) Erin Ivry Kindergarten (K-I) Nicole Hayes Associate (K-I) Abby Dachs E’rika Chambers
Student-Parent Handbook 2010-2011

Grade One (1-D) Associate (1-D)

Mary Welday Holly Leary Athena Benevento Cathy Cannon-Corea Lisa Rice Melissa Spear Tracy Brennan Carol O’Malley Danny Scuderi Amy Torrano Natalie Inglis Alexa Johnson Krystin Reese Cristina Baldyga

Grade One (1-W) Associate (1-W) Grade One (1D/1W) Grade Two (2-C) Associate (2-C) Grade Two (2-S) Associate (2-S) Grade Three (3-O) Associate (3-O) Grade Three (3-T) Associate (3-T) Grade Four (4-J) Grade Four (4-R) Associate (4)

Lower Form Specialists Greg Sinclair Physical Education (K-4) Will Jaggers Art (3-8) Anita Harmon Music (K-2) Todd Jolly Art (3-8) Ghislaine DeYoung Art (K-2) Marie O’Regan Religion (K-4) Middle Form Faculty Mary Blum Latin 6, 7, 8 Glen Bowers Physical Education 5-8 Kenny Buquen French 3-8 Dennis Estrada English 5, 6B Mariko Finn History 5,6 Daniel Fishman English 6A,7 Chad Gardner History 7,8 Sarah Gerlinger Religion 5-8 Ann Gigounas English 8, Study Skills 5 Linda Gutierrez Spanish 3-8, Paul Harvey Athletics Director, Health 7, 8 Will Jaggers Art 3-8 Todd Jolly Music 3-8 David Mc Spadden Mathematics 7, 8 Lauren Richardson Science, Health 5, 6 Arnaz Raj Science 7, 8 Christine Yuen Mathematics 5, 6, Rachel Kirkbride Technology Joanne Oppenheimer Fred Jaravata Library Amanda Scordis Corinne Corrigan Tevis Jones

Donna Williams

Kindergarten Team Lauren Goodrich (K-G) Erin Ivry (K-I) Addie Goldfrank (Assc. K-G) Nicole Hayes (Assoc. K-I) Grade Three Team
Student, Parent Handbook 2010-2011

Grade One Team Abby Dachs (1-D) Mary Welday (1-W) E’rika Chambers (Assc. 1-D) Holly Leary (Assc. 1-W) Athena Benevento (1D/1w) Grade Four Team
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Grade Two Team Cathy Cannon-Corea (2-C) Melissa Spear (2-S) Lisa Rice (Assc. 2-C) Tracy Brennan (Assc. 2-S) Grade Five Team

Amy Torrano (3-T) Carol O’Malley (3-0) Danny Scuderi (Assc. 3-O) Natalie Inglis (Assoc. 3-T)

Alexa Johnson (4-J) Krystin Reese (4-R) Cristina Baldyga (Assc. 4)

Grade Six Team Dennis Estrada, English 6B Daniel Fishman, English 6A Christine Yuen, Mathematics Lauren Richardson, Science, Health Mariko Finn, Social Studies Sarah Gerlinger, Religion Kenny Buquen, French Linda Gutierrez, Spanish Mary Blum, Latin Specialists Will Jaggers, Art (3-8) Ghilly DeYoung, Art (K-2) Todd Jolly, Music (3-8) Anita Harmon, Music (K-2) Glen Bowers, P.E., 5-8 Greg Sinclair, P.E., K-4 Kenny Buquen, French 3-8 Linda Gutierrez, Spanish 3-8 Mary Blum, Latin 6-8 Paul Harvey, Health 7-8

Grade Seven Team Daniel Fishman, English David McSpadden, Math Arnaj Raj, Science Chad Gardner, History Sarah Gerlinger, Religion Kenny Buquen, French Linda Gutierrez, Spanish Mary Blum, Latin Paul Harvey, Health Support Team Jan Hanway, Counselor, K-8 Mary Kay Leveroni, Learning Specialist, K-4 Alice Rose, Learning Specialist, 5-8 Mary Beth Cecchini, Learning Support Specialist

Dennis Estrada, English Christine Yuen, Mathematics Lauren Richardson, Sci/ Health Mariko Finn, Social Studies Sarah Gerlinger, Religion Kenny Buquen, French Linda Gutierrez, Spanish Ann Gigounas, Study Skills Grade Eight Team Ann Gigounas, English David McSpadden, Math Arnaz Raj, Science Chad Gardner, History Sarah Gerlinger, Religion Kenny Buquen, French Linda Gutierrez, Spanish Mary Blum, Latin Paul Harvey, Health Information Technology Fred Jaravata, Unkefer, Rachel Kirkbride Unkefer Joanne Oppenheimer, Unkefer Corinne Corrigan, Unkefer Donna Williams, Hoffman Tevis Jones, Hoffman Alison Decker, Hoffman

I. History and Tradition The Society of the Sacred Heart The Society of the Sacred Heart was established in Paris in 1800 by St. Madeleine Sophie Barat in response to the educational needs that followed in the wake of the French Revolution. In its subsequent development as a congregation now associated with 200 schools and colleges throughout the world, the Society has remained dedicated to the education of youth, adapting its program to the requirements of specific times and places but concerned always with “the value of the student as a person growing into full Christian participation in a democratic society.” The Convent of the Sacred Heart in San Francisco opened in 1887 at 1713 Bush Street. As the school grew, it moved from one location to another until it was established at 2700 Jackson Street, where it remained for 31 years. In 1939, Mrs. Maude Lee Flood gave the “Flood Mansion” at 2222 Broadway to the Religious of the Sacred Heart, who subsequently acquired three neighboring mansions as well. The Grant home became Convent of the Sacred Heart Elementary School for Girls in 1951; the Hammond Home became Stuart Hall for Boys in 1956. In 1986, the Herbst House was purchased to provide additional space for both elementary schools. In Fall 2001 Stuart Hall High School opened a new campus at Pine and Octavia Streets.
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Religious Heritage Schools of the Sacred Heart in San Francisco continue the strong international tradition of the Religious of the Sacred Heart founded over two centuries ago by St. Madeleine Sophie Barat. In our endeavor to educate the whole child, we are guided by the Goals and Criteria of the Network of Sacred Heart Schools in the United States. At the core of this Catholic tradition is faith in God and in Jesus Christ who reveals to us the love of God for all people. Students and families of all faiths are welcomed and embraced at Sacred Heart, where approximately one half of our students are from faith traditions other than Roman Catholic. Believing the family is the primary educator in matters of faith and spirituality, we seek to support both parents and students in their religious identity and in the faith foundations established in the home. By providing opportunities for community service, classes in religious studies, and multicultural celebrations, and by encouraging participation in various prayer forms and liturgies, we celebrate our religious heritage and help to form in our students deep human values, wise freedom and an informed active faith. School Organization Stuart Hall for Boys (SHB), Convent of the Sacred Heart Elementary School (CES), Convent of the Sacred Heart High School (CSH), and Stuart Hall High School (SHHS) comprise a four-school community, providing opportunities for students to interact with different age groups, to share academic programs and facilities, and to plan and carry out a variety of social events and activities. Stuart Hall for Boys is organized into two divisions: Lower Form (grades K-4) and Middle Form (grades 5-8). Accreditation Stuart Hall for Boys is fully accredited by the Network of Sacred Heart Schools, the California Association of Independent Schools (CAIS), and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The WASC-CAIS is a six year accreditation current until 2010. In addition, the Schools of the Sacred Heart are accredited by the Commission on Goals by the Provincial Superior of the Society of the Sacred Heart

Traditions The Schools of the Sacred Heart are rich in tradition. Religious celebrations are an important part of the Schools’ traditions. The year begins with a school blessing and is shortly followed by a welcome Mass of the Holy Spirit. The Schools celebrate two Sacred Heart feasts, Saint Philippine Duchesne (first Religious of the Sacred Heart in the USA) and Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat (foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart). In the autumn, the students also celebrate Mater Admirabilis -- a story about a fresco of the Virgin Mary in a pink gown -- Children of the Sacred Heart learn and enjoy.

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As a special sweet treat, children will celebrate with gouter which is French for a treat. Once a year and in secret the oldest class plans a surprise day of games and festivities called conge. This is often celebrated in the spring. Field Day is a day of sports and games when children are divided into four teams – green, red, blue, and gray – and compete in various “olympic” games. Field Day is often held during the last week of class in June. Prize Day and Commencement are days when students receive awards for academics and other honors. Prize Day finds its roots in the first Sacred Heart schools and in Goal 2, “a deep respect for intellectual values.” These prizes include Promotion and Recognition Cards, books, certificates, and pins. Prize Day is an exciting day for students. Goal 1 invites each member of the school community to “a personal and active faith in God.” Weekly chapel is a vital part of life at Stuart Hall. In addition to special one, two, and four-school Masses and celebrations, Stuart Hall boys attend weekly chapel; they listen to a scriptural lesson, hear a homily or reflection, offer prayers of petition, reflect quietly, and often sing. The chapel program has its roots in the liturgy of morning prayer but is also inclusive as it celebrates major Christian and non-Christian holidays as well as the sacredness of ordinary days. Students play an active role in worship by public reading, speaking, and singing. Tres Bien is a special chapel when teachers give special recognition to students for work, conduct, and actions that best exemplify the Goals and Criteria of Sacred Heart education, especially Goal V, which fosters “ personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom” Tres Bien has its roots in the Sacred Heart tradition of Primes when students received cards from the Reverend Mother recognizing very good (tres bien), good (bien), and good enough (assez bien) cards. Today, only the tres bien cards remain. Once each week the Stuart Hall community gathers for assembly. Led by the Student Council, assembly is a time for an opening prayer or reflection, the Pledge of Allegiance, announcements from students, teachers, and administrators, and, on occasion, presentations from classes, the arts, or guests to Stuart Hall. These assemblies are Stuart Hall’s “town meetings” and help the school develop “the building of community as a Christian value” (Goal 4). Graduates of Stuart Hall remember first their experiences of community service and the direct connection it has to Goal 3, “a social awareness which impels to action.” Individual classes develop various community service practices. For example, grade four assumes responsibility for lost and found, and the sixth grade takes charge of paper recycling. The student council initiates annual service drives, including the Thanksgiving food drive and the Lenten school supplies drive. In grades seven and eight, students leave the campus and do community service work in a host of prearranged sites under the direction of trained volunteer directors and under the aegis of the faculty. Special eighth grade traditions include using wearing the traditional Stuart Hall red tie, planning congé, and other special events that the faculty offer during the year. These privileges acknowledge our eighth graders as school leaders. II. Philosophy of Education Goals and Criteria The Schools of the Sacred Heart in the United States, members of a world-wide network, offer an education that is marked by a distinctive spirit. It is of the essence of a
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Sacred Heart school that it be deeply concerned for each student’s total development: spiritual, intellectual, social, emotional, physical. It also emphasizes serious study, that it educate to social responsibility, and that it lay the foundation of a strong faith. In 1975, the Network of Sacred Heart Schools published five goals and criteria that provide the guidelines for Sacred Heart education in the United States. Several years ago, this set of guidelines was revised and re-published. The 2005 Goals and Criteria express the values, the intentions, and the hopes of the Sacred Heart tradition, finely-tuned to meet the needs of our rapidly changing world. Schools of the Sacred Heart commit themselves to educate to: ? a personal and active faith in God; ? a deep respect for intellectual values; ? a social awareness which impels to action; ? the building of community as a Christian value. ? personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom. Parent-School Partnership We believe that in sending your son(s) to Stuart Hall you have entered into an exciting partnership with professional educators who are deeply committed to educating the whole child. To develop this partnership, the School relies upon parent support of our philosophy of education and its expression in the day-to-day school and classroom programs. This partnership includes supporting the Schools’ policies, procedures, traditions, and decisions and/or being willing to communicate directly with appropriate school personnel whenever concerns or questions arise. Part of the School’s belief is to help children act in wise freedom (Goal V) and become their own advocates. To enhance this communication, the school urges students and parents to speak first to the teacher with whom one is having a concern. In the middle form, it is also very beneficial to speak to the student’s advisor with or after one has spoken to the teacher and prior to communicating with the dean. If that communication is not successful, it is best next to speak to the dean of the form. If there is a concern that is more general, it is best to work closely with the dean of the boy’s form. If the concern or difficulty is still not resolved, then it is appropriate to meet with the Head of School. The goal of communication is to resolve problems and clarify misunderstandings. Another aspect of good communication is to model for children effective ways of dealing with difficulties. There are many ways for parents to take an active interest in their son’s life and work at Stuart Hall: ? Get to know your son’s classmates, teachers, and advisor by making plans in advance to spend some volunteering for a field trip, celebrating birthdays, helping out in the classroom, volunteering for a community service project, or other projects, such as Field Day, Celebrate Spring, and holiday celebrations. ? Encourage creative individual projects, independent inquiry, and extra reading at home. ? Be alert to any difficulties your son may be having or changes in his routines and patterns. Notify the teacher, advisor, counselor, or learning specialist as soon as a concern arises.

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?

Read the weekly publication, Thursday Notes, so you will be aware of school activities, sports, special events, student achievements and dress uniform days, and general news from teachers and administrators. Mutual Respect

The Goals and Criteria of Sacred Heart education call each of us – administration, faculty, staff, students, and parents – to a deep and abiding respect for the dignity and worth of each person. Goal Four, in particular, stresses the importance of community as a Christian value. It is imperative, therefore, that each member of the community treat other members with thoughtfulness and charity. Most families are supportive of the School. In situations of frustration or disappointment, however, there are a few who have appeared to disregard the values inherent in Goal Four. If a parent develops a pattern of approaching administration, faculty, or staff in a manner contradictory to the values reflected in the Goals and Criteria, the administration will invite the parent to meet and evaluate whether the values and mission of this school are consistent with those of the family. Should this pattern continue, the family may be asked to leave the school. III. General Policies Contracts The Schools of the Sacred Heart have contracted with you for the education of your children for the current school year. These contracts or enrollment agreements are renewable annually. Unless you are otherwise notified, you can expect to receive the renewal contract sometime in late winter/ early spring. If students do not perform well academically or if their social and/or emotional development is a concern, the enrollment agreement may be held until appropriate action has been taken or until it becomes clear what the best situation for the child will be. Delinquent tuition is also a cause for withholding the enrollment agreement. Financial Aid The Schools of the Sacred Heart strive for excellence in education and for diversity in the student body. The administration and faculty of the Schools of the Sacred Heart are dedicated to the belief that a vital part of education in a pluralistic society is the opportunity to grow up with students from different social, cultural and economic backgrounds. Financial aid is extended to those students whose need for such aid is established and who otherwise could not afford to enroll. Financial aid is needbased and awarded without regard to race, color, religion, nationality or ethnic origin. All financial aid requests are handled through the Admissions Office. All information regarding financial aid is kept in strict confidence. Parents complete a confidential statement, which is processed by School Scholarship Service (SSS) in Princeton, New Jersey. Parents also submit to the school their most recent 1040 (IRS) as part of their application process. The Admissions Office informs parents about any

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grant they may or may not receive. For more information about financial aid, please contact the Admission Office. Attendance
Because supervision is not available, no boy should arrive at school before 7:30 AM. Those boys arriving between 7:30 and 8:00 AM must sign-in to the cafeteria and follow the instructions of the teacher on duty. At 8:00am Kindergarten and First Grade boys should report directly to their homeroom classes. Students in grades 2-4 should report to designated play courts until 8:15am. Lower form boys are escorted by their teachers. Kindergarten boys are often taken to their classrooms by their parents during the first semester. Students in grades 5-8 go directly to their lockers in the SHB building (during the month of September all 5th grade students report directly to their lockers & homeroom at 8:00am). All middle form boys then proceed to their 1st period class (on Mondays & Wednesdays), or homeroom on Tuesday, Thursdays, & Fridays which begins at 8:10am. Middle form students attending an early morning class, rehearsal, or extra-curricular activity should report directly to the Teacher’s classroom. Students arriving after 8:15am are late and marked tardy for that day. Middle form students who arrive after the homeroom period (8:10 – 8:20), should report to the SHB Office. Both absences and tardies are noted on the report card and become part of each boy’s permanent record. If a student has to leave school early, the parent must write a note to school, clearly stating the child’s destination, his time of departure from school, where the parent will pick him up and what time he will return to school (if he will return). Students must sign out from the SHB office prior to leaving campus early. Students who leave school with someone other than their regular carpool driver should notify the teacher in writing of the proposed change. Because Stuart Hall enjoys an urban campus shared by three schools, dismissal is staggered:

Days Monday – Thursday

Classes Kindergarten 1st – 2nd 3rd – 4th 5th – 8th Kindergarten 1st – 2nd 3rd – 4th 5th – 8th

Monday - Thursday Times 2:45 pm 3:00 pm 3:15 pm 3:40 pm 11:30 AM 12:00 PM 12:15PM 12:30 PM

Friday Times 2:00 pm 2:15 pm 2:30 pm 2:55 pm 11:30 AM 12:00 PM 12:15PM 12:30 PM

Midday

The purpose of an early dismissal on Fridays is to provide parents time for medical and dental appointments so that students will not miss critical instructional time.

Absences

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Regular school attendance is essential for success. When a child is absent, please contact the school office (292-3143 or 292-3144) before 9:00 AM. Please schedule appointments after school or on Friday afternoons (early dismissal time: 2:40) when possible. Parents of absent students may call the office between 8:00 and 9:00 AM to request homework assignments for that day. These assignments should be picked up in the office between 3:00 and 4:00 PM. Parents may also check faculty homework websites. If a child misses more than three consecutive days, the School requests that a doctor's note accompany the student's return to school. If a pattern of frequent absences develops, the school will arrange for a conference to evaluate what is the best academic setting for the student. Tardiness How a student begins the morning sets the tone for entire day; thus, arriving on time is important. Students who are tardy must get a late pass from the office before they are admitted to class. Patterns of chronic tardiness may require a parent-teacher conference or disciplinary action. Please make sure your sons are on time! Extended Vacations The school calendar is designed to provide ample vacation time and is published in advance to provide families the opportunity to arrange for family vacations. Because school attendance is critical to a student’s success, the School discourages both additional vacations and the extending of vacations before or beyond the listed dates. These extra vacations burden the student, who misses explanations, discussions and other class activities that cannot be made up or replaced. In the event of a family emergency, and whenever possible, the School will make every effort to provide materials needed for makeup work as well as a time period for students to complete their missed work. Procedures for Requesting Excused Extended Absences 1. Contact the Dean in writing with the request well in advance of the planned absence and include specific dates and/or times your son needs to be absent. 2. The Dean will discuss the request with appropriate teachers and with the Head of school. From these conversations, the dean will determine the necessary assignments to be completed during the absence. 3. In conversation with the teachers, the student may be asked to design a special project for a class presentation, which will be descriptive of something he has learned during his absence.

Community Service Goal Three: to educate to a social awareness which impels to action.

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Mission: The mission of community service is to foster within the total community Goal Three of the Goals and Criteria of Sacred Heart Education which calls for all to commit "to a social awareness which impels to action." Vision: The goal for community service begins with the developing consciousness of the student. The student will begin to discover through classes, lessons, peer interactions, service project interactions, and community knowledge that change is called for in places where oppression and injustice exist. Growth: Service projects will incorporate three phases: preparation, implementation, and reflection in order to impress upon students the due diligence, commitment, and personal investment involved in the pursuit of lasting change. Students motivate each other and the community by creating change in the classroom and the community. Students are made aware of specific populations that can benefit from assistance and support. Students experience first hand how serving those in need can effect real change in lifestyles and society and its values. Metamorphosis: A student's journey begins a life-long time of service and caring for the needs of others. Through the three phases of service, students will acquire an understanding of society that helps them to see that resources can be shared for the good of all and do something to effect change. Proposals for Community Service Projects Proposals for community service projects are submitted to the campus ministry office (Kristin Monfredini /Marie O'Regan / Philip Majorins): 1. Explain your community service project. ? Who will be helped by this project? ? What is the need of this constituency? ? How will students meet this need? 2. Explain how this project will be implemented. ? Who will be primarily responsible for the coordination of this project? ? Who is the contact person for the constituency receiving service? ? What arrangements have been made for this constituency to receive the service being offered? ? What resources from the School will be required to facilitate this projects? Students? Parents? Staff? Transportation? ? How long will the project last? ? What are the itemized budgetary needs for the project? How will you acquire this funding? ? Who will provide the service? ? How will the community learn of this project?

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3. Will this project create an experience in keeping with the Schools' community service philosophy? ? Explain how the three phases of community service will be fulfilled in this project. ? Is this project in keeping with the Schools' philosophy? Birthdays The boys usually celebrate their birthday in school by arranging for a special treat to be shared with their classmates. If parents want to invite boys to an out-ofschool party, the School recommends that less than one-half or all of the class be invited to the party. If all of the boys are not invited to the party, the Schools strongly recommends that invitations not be brought to school. House and Baby Sitting The School strongly discourages hiring teachers to baby sit and/or house sit. Visitors and Guests If a boy wishes to bring a friend or relative to attend classes or visit the campus, he or his parents should let the Dean know in advance so that teachers can be notified and preparations can be made to welcome guests and help them feel at home. Make Up Work In all cases of absence, it is the student’s responsibility to ask teachers about work missed and to make it up by getting class notes, taking tests and quizzes, completing written assignments or making up labs. In the middle form, make up work done as a result of excused absences must generally be completed in a two-week period. Students receiving a grade of “I” (incomplete) must have all work completed by the end of the following quarter. Failure to complete assigned work may result in a failing grade. In cases of excessive absence (ten or more days per semester), particularly when makeup work is not completed in a timely manner, the school reserves the right to use a "pass/fail" grading system as necessary.

Parent Absences When parents are away from home, the school must be notified in writing who is responsible for the child, who will be picking the child up from school, and whether the child will be at home or staying at another address.

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Uniform Students are expected to be in complete uniform at all times, except on free dress days or when otherwise notified. Students have a regular uniform and a dress uniform, both of which can be purchased at: 590 10th Street 415-864-4301 San Francisco, CA The physical education shirts and Stuart Hall sweatshirts are now sold through Dennis Uniform. Lunch A Catering company provides the option of daily lunch service for students in Grades 18. So that children do not have to carry cash, the company requests advanced payment with a credit line. Boys may buy drinks, fruit, etc. as lunch supplements. Students also have the option of bringing their own lunch. Lockers, Desks, and Cubbies Stuart Hall develops in its boys a respect for property of others as well as their own property. Students in grades K – 4 keep their books in their classroom desks and their supplies in their classrooms. In grade 5-8, students are assigned a locker in September and encouraged to keep them locked at all times. In September, students in grades 5-8 are issued school locks. No lock other than that issued by the school is allowed on lockers. When not in use, lockers should be locked. The locks must be returned to homeroom teachers at the end of the school year or the student will be responsible for replacement costs. Only schoolsupplied combination locks are allowed. Lost locks can be replaced at a cost of ten dollars ($10.) Lost and Found
Because of space constraints this year, the SHB Lost and Found area is limited. There will be an area in the SHB building designated for Lost and Found. There is also an area outside of the afterschool/extension program for Lost and Found. It is imperative that all clothing and miscellaneous items are clearly marked with both the boy’s first and last name. More personal or expensive items, such as watches and wallets are turned in to the office.

Dennis Uniform

Communications and Electronic Devices Telephones and Messages: Students should ask permission before using a school telephone. Messages from home to students are accepted only on an emergency basis. Reminders of appointments and various after-school activities should be between parent and child; parents cannot rely upon the office to intercede.

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Cellular Phones: Students should not have cellular telephones in school during class time. Any student using a cell phone during class time will have it taken away by the teacher. Parents will be contacted if the student ignores this policy. Electronic Games: Recess is a time for students to play together. Not only is this a valuable time for students to have fun with each other, recess also develops a sense of community among the boys. To that end, the School does not permit students to have electronic games in school. In addition, the School discourages students from having iPods and other audio devices. Any devices found on the student during the school day will be taken by the teacher and returned to them after parents are contacted. Toys, Weapons, or the Appearance Thereof No toy weapons are to be on school property or on a school field trip. These include but are not limited to: toy guns, water guns, plastic knives, toy knives, or pocket knives. Handbook Changes The Head retains the right to amend the Handbook for just cause. If changes are made, parents will be given prompt notification. The Head may make exceptions to these policies and procedures in cases with mitigating circumstances, which call for a different response. IV. The Academic Program

Homerooms, Curriculum, and Schedules Each boy in Grades K-8 is assigned to a specific homeroom. In Grades K-4, students have the homeroom teacher for a majority of their subjects and spend the greater part of their day in that classroom. Grades 5-8 learn in a departmentalized program where students change teachers, rooms and sections on a regular basis. Homerooms are heterogeneously grouped with academic, cultural and social factors all taken into consideration. Students begin their day with a brief homeroom period and then proceed to chapel, assembly, (LF and MF) advisory, their first class (MF), or other special activities. The curriculum for Grades K-8 includes English, mathematics, science, social studies, religion, health, computer, the fine and performing arts, and physical education. Stuart Hall boys begin foreign language instruction in grade three and choose either French or Spanish after grade four. All sixth grade boys take Latin and have the option after grade six of taking Latin in grades seven and eight in place of either Spanish of French. In order to be promoted to the next grade or to graduate from Stuart Hall, students must successfully complete all of the courses in the prescribed curriculum.
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Student Council To be eligible to run for Student Council officer (Commissioner General, Assistant Commissioner, Religion Commissioner), a student must have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA and be in good standing with the faculty. Books and Materials The instructional materials budget of the school covers all required classroom texts and supplementary materials. Students are expected to take good care of their books. Students are strongly encouraged to label their books and materials and cover hardbound textbooks. If a book is lost or damaged, it becomes the student’s responsibility to pay for a replacement copy.

Homework Policy
Homework Philosophy/Goals Homework is an important component of Stuart Hall’s program. It is an extension of the regular school day; it is a time for thoughtful, independent application. Stuart Hall’s commitment to its students and parents is to assign work that will have the greatest benefit to the boys and their education. We believe the following points are essential in understanding how and why homework is assigned: ? ? ? Research indicates that schools in which homework is regularly assigned and evaluated tend to have higher achieving students and more positive attitudes towards learning. When approached properly, homework helps students develop independence, responsibility, organizational skills, time management and overall good study habits. Homework is used by teachers not only to reinforce and expand upon concepts taught in the classroom and as a way to evaluate student mastery of the subject matter, it also gives students the opportunity to reflect upon the lessons and ideas that they have encountered during the day. Homework is not busy work, and it should never be used as a punishment. School-wide homework guidelines are a challenge to define because of individual student needs and different teacher and grade level expectations. The SHB faculty has studied various components of homework and has formally surveyed faculty & parents, and has informally surveyed students, and has agreed to the following guidelines, knowing that there may be exceptions now and then through the normal course of the school year.

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Amount of Time on Homework ? Amount of time students are expected to devote to homework will vary each night from class to class, grade to grade, and individual to individual, but generally the average amount of time spent on homework is as follows: Kindergarten up to: 5 – 10 minutes 1st - 2nd: up to: 20 – 25 minutes 3rd: up to: 35 – 50 minutes th 4 : up to: 40 – 60 minutes 5th: up to: 60 – 90 minutes th th: 6 -8 up to: 90 – 120 minutes/30 minutes per core subject *The times above do not include independent nightly reading, which is encouraged at all grade levels. ? ? ? ? Homework is assigned in grades kindergarten through eighth. Depending on the grade, long-range projects and short-term assignments are given throughout the year. Teachers may set a maximum time limit for homework. If a student cannot complete his work in the time allotted, he should come to school the next day with a note from a parent briefly explaining the situation. Individual students may qualify for modifications on homework assignments based on recommendations of the SHB Child-Study Team. These modifications will be accommodated as needed in coordination with teacher and learning specialist. There is generally less homework on weekends and no homework will be assigned over holidays or three-day weekends with the exception of long-term projects.

?

Homework Responsibilities
STUDENTS: ? Complete assignments thoroughly and hand them in on time. ? Take responsibility for make-up work if absent. ? Print and prepare all homework assignments at home. You should not rely on printing out your homework at school. Printing problems will sometimes occur, but these should not be excuses for incomplete work. At those times, you should plan to come into school early to use the computer lab printing facilities. Forgetting a file required for class is like forgetting a textbook or homework; the work will be considered late. ? Use your assignment notebook and organize your binder daily. ? Focus on homework and suspend all other activities (phone calls, text messaging, instant messaging, surfing the internet, chat rooms). ? Keep your study area clean and orderly. ? Develop self-advocacy skills; ask for help when you need it.

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School/Teachers: ? Create meaningful assignments and avoid assignments that require adult help ? Clearly post homework on classroom boards, handouts, study guides, and web pages. ? Clearly state the consequences of late or missing work to students & parents through study notices (MF) ? When long-term projects are assigned, support students in the use of a written management plan to help manage the different components of the project. ? Collaborate with other teachers by using the internal Middle Form online calendar, which outlines quizzes, tests, and long-term projects assigned to the students. ? Encourage boys to develop self-advocacy skills around finding clarity in assignments. ? Emphasize that the learning process happens through effort and commitment and not perfection. ? Encourage students to take risks in their learning and learn from mistakes. ? Parents: Take an interest in your son’s schoolwork; however, the best approach is to be the “guide on the side,” leading your child towards a solution, not providing it. If you find you have the scissors, paste, crayons, laptop, pen, or pencil in your hands, then you are doing too much. Remember that homework is the child’s domain, not the parents’. Let your son be responsible for completing work and returning it to the teacher in a timely manner. “Rescuing” your son if he leaves homework at home is neither helpful nor necessary. It is important to allow your son to face the consequences and be held accountable for late/missing homework. Check your son’s assignment book (grades 4th-8th) to keep informed as to when assignments are due. Clarify directions when asked. If your child asks you to look over written work, go ahead and give him helpful feedback, but don’t go through the work with a fine-toothed comb. Ask what it is your son would like you to look for. Guide your son in his homework; don’t edit it or do it for him. Remember, the teacher needs to see the types of errors your son is making in order to successfully teach to his specific needs. In the end it is about stepping back and letting your child succeed. Provide space, materials and a consistent time for homework to be done…that includes an ending time. A space free of unnecessary and repetitive distractions is usually a better place for concentrated study. Don’t allow homework to become a source of constant stress or a battleground at home. If your son is experiencing difficulties or you have questions, be sure to communicate directly with your son’s teacher and/or advisor.

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? ?

Portions of this homework policy have been adapted from other current homework policies. Specifically we would like to acknowledge the homework policies at Seven Hills School & Delano Middle School. ?Stuart Hall for Boys Homework Policy, 2006.

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Originality of One’s Work Learning to do original work, especially in research projects is a difficult lesson. Part of the learning process is to introduce children to the concept of plagiarism and how one can use another’s work or ideas if one gives appropriate credit to the originator of the work. Part of the library program is learning about citations. Cheating includes the copying of other students’ homework, the submission of other’s work as a student’s own, and the taking of information from an outside source during a test or quiz. The Internet has presented scholars and educators with a host of new challenges regarding citation. The library has already addressed this with the students and has taught them proper citation for Internet research. Learning that plagiarism is cheating is a vital lesson for all students. The School does not permit students to copy another’s work and will, when appropriate, take appropriate action when this happens. Students who are caught cheating or plagiarizing (this is with intention and, thus, applies to older students) may receive a failure on the homework, quiz, exam or project. Cheating in testing and/or examinations may result in a more serious consequence. The first incident of cheating will be followed by a letter to parents and verbal notice of pending probation. After a second incident of cheating, the student will be put on probation and the Child Study Team will be notified of the student’s actions. Achievement Grades Students receive achievement marks in grades 5 – 8. The letter and numerical grades have numerical equivalents and are computed to determine a grade point average (GPA). The following conversion chart explains the equivalents: Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DFailure A GPA 4.0 3.7 3.5 3.0 2.7 2.5 2.0 1.7 1.5 1.0 0.7 0 Percent 93-100 90-92 88-89 83-87 80-82 78-79 73-77 70-72 68-69 63-67 60-62 0-59

Performs in a superior fashion in class, homework, tests, and quizzes; exhibits exemplary effort, focus, and participation; generally achieves in the 90 - 100 percent range.

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B

Performs well in class, homework, tests, and quizzes; exhibits strong effort, focus and participation; generally achieves in the 80 – 90 percent range. Meets standard expectations in class, homework, tests, and quizzes; exhibits satisfactory effort, focus, and participation; generally achieves in the 70 –80 percent range. Does not meet standard expectations in class, homework, tests, and quizzes; exhibits inconsistent effort, focus, and participation; generally achieves in the 60 –70 percent range. Fails to meet minimal expectations in class, homework, tests, and quizzes; exhibits poor effort, focus, and participation; generally achieves below the 60 percent range.

C

D

F

All courses are included in the GPA calculation on a weighted scale. For example the core courses (English, Science, Math/Algebra, History, Religion, Foreign Language) are given full weight. Other courses (PE, Music, Art, Contemporary Issues, Health) are given a defined weight depending on the frequency of the class meetings per week. Citizenship & Effort Grades The citizenship & effort grades are a formal method of assessment for every middle form boy. At the conclusion of every quarter a student receives an effort grade and citizenship grade along with his academic letter grade. The citizenship grade is not included in the student’s GPA for each semester. Listed below is the criteria for the citizenship grade and effort grade:

Citizenship Grade Criteria A Acts positively towards peers and teachers, setting a behavioral example for other students Has few, if any, behavioral issues inside and outside the classroom Rarely disturbs others in class Listens and follows teacher directions consistently Accepts correction and/or self corrects and improves behavior in a timely manner Has not received any disciplinary referrals or upon receipt of such has taken immediate steps to improve his behavior. B Usually acts positively towards peers and teachers Has some behavioral issues inside and outside the classroom Occasionally disturbs others in class Sometimes does not listen and follow teacher directions Usually improves behavior upon correction and/or self-corrects
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Has not received any disciplinary referrals or upon receipt of such has taken immediate steps to improve his behavior. C Often does not act positively towards peers and teachers Frequent behavioral and social problems Often disturbs others in class Often does not listen and follow teacher directions Often does not improve behavior even after correction and does not self-correct May have received disciplinary referrals for blatant misbehavior D Seldom acts positively towards peers and teachers Consistent behavioral and/or social problems Consistently disruptive Rarely listens or follows teacher directions Rarely improves behavior even after correction and lacks self-discipline Has received several disciplinary referrals for blatant misbehavior

Effort Grade: Criteria E = Excellent ? Consistently uses time and materials effectively ? Consistently assumes responsibility for completing work. ? Consistently cooperative with teachers and peers ? Consistently comes to class with required materials ? Makes strong contributions to class discussions and group activities. ? Consistently on time to class. S = Satisfactory ? Makes occasional contributions to class discussions ? Cooperates during group activities with teachers & peers ? Generally comes to class prepared with required materials ? Generally completes work on time ? Generally on time to class. ? Returns study notices & attempts to advocate for himself U = Unsatisfactory ? Frequently missing homework resulting in Study Notices ? Makes inappropriate/distracting remarks during class discussions ? Struggles to work collaboratively with classmates during group activities ? Frequently comes to class unprepared without required materials ? Rarely submits missing or late work ? Frequently tardy for class

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Academic Honors At the end of each semester, students in 6th through 8th who receive a GPA from 3.67 to 4.00 earn First Honors. Students with grade point averages from 3.33 to 3.66 receive Second Honors.

Study Notices Study notices in the middle form are a direct form of communication between school and home. Teachers write study notices when middle form students do not complete assignments, have difficulty with a class or lesson, perform poorly on a quiz or a test, or arrive tardy to class. After a student receives a study notice he has it signed by his parent and returns it to the teacher the next day. Failure to return the study notice in some cases will result in a Friday detention. Multiple study notices from a teacher will result in a parent conference. Homework Club Homework Club is designed for students who have not completed or turned in a home assignment or if a student would like a quiet place to work after school. Students and parents are given one day's notice that the student will attend Homework Club on the following day for a specified period of time as stated on the Study Notice. Failure to attend Homework Club will result in a Disciplinary Notice. Homework Club is also available to boys who wish to work on other upcoming assignments. HWC meets Mon, Tues, Thurs, 3:40-4:40pm, Fri: 2:45-3:45pm and is proctored by a SHB faculty member. One-Month Notices One month prior to the end of the grading cycle, parents of a middle form student who are presently earning a grade of C- or lower will receive a One-Month Notice from the teacher & dean. Upon receiving this notice student & parents should arrange a conference to attend to the specific academic concerns. This contact often results in a student improving his grades. E.R.B.s Each year in the spring, students in grades 3-7 are given the ERB (Educational Records Bureau) tests. Several sections are completed each day and the computerized results are sent to the school during the summer. These results are sent to parents in the fall. Please keep in mind that these scores represent only one aspect of a student’s academic performance; some students test better than others, and the “graph” of his

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performance from year to year is more significant than any single score or single year’s performance. The school’s learning specialists are available to discuss the test results if parents have questions that the report does not answer. During testing week (spring), parents are reminded to make sure their sons get a good night’s sleep and eat a healthy breakfast. Accommodations are offered to those students that the Child Study Team determines have a qualifying educational evaluation noting the specific accommodation e.g. extended time, reader, etc. The Learning Specialists will contact the parents of students who have been determined to have a qualifying educational evaluation on file prior to the testing dates to ask for their authorization (in writing) of the use of the accommodation. Conferences Formal parent conferences are scheduled online for parents of boys in Grades K8. Conferences are held with the homeroom teacher, classroom teachers, and/or advisor. The purpose of the conferences is to review academic progress and discuss social and emotional development. On some occasions, parents, teachers or administrators may request an interim conference should concerns arise or extra support seem necessary. On some occasions, teachers or parents may request that the student be present for a conference. In addition to these formal conferences, teachers or parents may request a meeting to discuss academic or social concerns. Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities The Goals and Criteria of Sacred Heart education remind us that education extends far beyond the boundaries of the classroom. Educating the “whole child” means educating the spirit, the body, and the mind. Students are taught to build upon natural talents by enhancing the school curricular activities with extra-curricular activities, such as fine arts, sports, outdoor clubs, and leadership development opportunities. Some of the opportunities include student government, four-school orchestra, chorus, vocal ensemble, and drama, as well as a variety of sports teams and clubs. Students should keep in mind that such activities should remain balanced and supportive of their academic activities.

Child Study Team (CST) Stuart Hall has a Child Study Team composed of the Head of Stuart Hall, the dean(s), the learning specialist and/or the learning resource teacher, the counselor, and the explorations coordinator. Teachers who have academic, social, or emotional concerns about a student write a referral to the CST and then present to the CST their observations. It is the responsibility of the CST to respond to the referral with an action

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plan that may involve a parent conference, remediation, enrichment, evaluation, or visits with the counselor.

Tutoring 1. Teacher Recommendation a. Teacher makes a request for tutoring to the Child Study Team (CST) b. CST reviews the request c. If CST approves the request, CST will also recommend a list of tutors for the family to pursue d. CST will coordinate a conference with parents to make recommendations for tutoring 2. Parent Requests for Tutoring a. Teacher explains the CST process and will facilitate the request b. Teacher will follow the process outlined in point #1 3. Teacher Tutoring Policy a. Teachers may not tutor a child in his/her class or grade. b. Teachers may tutor a SHB boy only after discussion with the CST and with approval of the administration c. Teachers may not tutor a SHB boy during the academic day 4. Outside Tutors on Campus a. Outside tutors may tutor a SHB boy on campus, after school and with the approval of the Dean and Director of After School Programs b. Outside tutors may not tutor a SHB boy during the school day, nor may a SHB boy leave school for tutoring during the school day. School Counselor The school counselor assists the parents and faculty with the emotional and psychological development of the students. The counselor helps children whose families are in a time of crisis, such as a divorce, a death, or a disaster. She also supports and guides children with such issues as low self-esteem, teasing, and aggression. If the problem seems to be a long term one, the counselor makes appropriate referrals. She is the liaison between outside therapists and the School. The counselor conducts monthly parent education classes. Explorations The Explorations Program aims to provide students with additional opportunities to excel and to stretch their intellectual capabilities. Students are challenged to develop critical thinking skills by experimenting with problem solving

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techniques, manipulating and re-organizing the knowledge they already possess and taking risks with new materials and concepts. The primary goal of Explorations is to provide support for students and their teachers, in the form of additional instruction or in the provision of specialized programming material. Participation in the Explorations program will be determined by the recommendation of classroom teachers to the Child Study Team who will make the final determination. Promotion and Graduation Requirements Students in Kindergarten - Grade 8 are expected to make satisfactory progress in their studies and be promoted to the next grade each year. In some instances, a student’s social or academic development may make tutoring or repetition of a grade necessary. Every student in Grades 5-7 must complete what teachers determine to be a satisfactory level of class work, homework, and consistent attendance. Year-end failure in any two academic subjects can be reason for dismissal. Tutoring or summer school may be required by the school before the student is issued a re-enrollment agreement for the next grade. Secondary School Placement The High School Placement counselor and the Middle Form Dean serve as the high school placement counselors for Stuart Hall for Boys. It is their role to facilitate the placement and re-enrollment process in collaboration with the Head of School. They work closely with faculty, specialists and student advisors in completing recommendations and application materials. The placement process involves student, dean, and HS placement counselor meetings, parent and student meetings, application for and facilitation of standardized testing, written recommendations, distribution of transcripts and other application materials, and finally helping families choose an option best for the student. Parents of seventh grade students will meet at the end of the school year to clarify the placement process for the upcoming year. Private appointments with the placement counselor begin at the end of the first quarter of eighth grade. Eighth grade students who wish to visit other schools during school time must have a written note from home at least a week in advance. Visits to other schools should be planned carefully so that the effect on a student’s academic performance is minimal. Students who visit other schools are expected to make up any work that they have missed in class. Parents are encouraged to plan ahead and use in-service and other Stuart Hall holidays to schedule visits. Lower Form Reception of First Reconciliation and First Communion At the beginning of the 2nd grade, Catholic students have the opportunity to receive the sacraments of First Reconciliation and First Communion at Stuart Hall for Boys. Students whose families elect to have them receive the sacraments at school, will be
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prepared by the lower form religion teacher. Prior to the reception of the sacraments, the following must be submitted to the school: 1. Baptismal certificate 2. The name and address of the Catholic parish where First Reconciliation/Communion certificates will be sent and officially filed Uniform Descriptions Regular Uniform: K Navy shorts, (gray flannel shorts optional for regular uniform), white short sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest, navy v-neck sweater, brown or black shoes with non-marking soles worn with dark socks, navy Stuart Hall fleece jacket (optional) 1 Navy shorts, white short sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest, navy v-neck sweater, brown or black shoes with non-marking soles worn with dark socks, navy Stuart Hall fleece jacket (optional) Navy pants or navy shorts, white short sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest, navy v-neck sweater, dark socks, dark belt, low-top black or brown shoes (e.g. Oxford, loafer, rubber soled shoes) or all black leather or vinyl athletic shoes, navy Stuart Hall fleece jacket (optional)

2-4

Dress Uniform: K-1 gray shorts, white short sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest, navy v-neck sweater, navy knee-socks, black shoes 2 –4 gray pants, white oxford button-down shirt, school tie for 2nd/3rd/4th grade, navy blazer with crest, dark socks, dark belt, brown or black dress shoes If a lower form boy does not wear his dress uniform on the appointed day, the dean will also send a note home with a reminder dress uniform calendar. Physical Education Uniform: K-2 No physical education uniform is required 3-8 Stuart Hall red and gray/ white reversible physical education shirt, change of pants (.e.g. shorts, or sweatpants – only for physical education) 5-8 Athletics shoes (all black, all white, or black & white)

Discipline Goal V in Goals and Criteria is the desire “to promote personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom.” This growth comes from self-discipline within each boy. To that end, the School’s understanding of discipline is the fostering of responsibility and independence. In the lower form, a Stuart Hall boy begins to understand what the acceptable limits of his behavior are and what consequences may follow when he “oversteps” a limit. The following is an outline of the lower form’s behavioral expectations: Philosophy of Lower Form Discipline: Concern for each other and other’s personal property
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A. Following classroom rules set by the teacher and the class B. Following the playground rules 1. Being careful of others and avoiding rough play 2. Not making fun of others 3. Not teasing or bullying 4. Giving another a chance to apologize for a mistake 5. Not using foul language C. Following cafeteria rules 1. Using inside voices at all times 2. Cleaning up lunch areas 3. Remaining seated 4. Standing in an orderly and quiet line when entering and leaving the cafeteria When a student has a difficulty, a teacher may send a disciplinary notice to the parents or have a student meet with the Dean of Lower Form. The purpose of the disciplinary notice is to keep parents informed about a boy’s conduct. The over-arching goal of the lower form’s disciplinary system is to help the students focus on acting and choosing in an atmosphere of wise freedom. Boys who are involved in physical aggression will be sent home. Playground Rules: 1. Balls will be allowed only during mid-morning and lunch recesses. 2. Wrestling is not permitted at any time. 3. All playground equipment (balls, jump ropes, basketball goals, etc.) is to be used only for its intended purpose. 4. Students may not climb fences, buildings, etc. 5. Students may retrieve stray balls only with adult permission. 6. During recess, classes are to stay on their designated courts. 7. Students must ask permission before leaving the playground. Boys in grades K-2 must travel with a buddy. If a student fails to follow these playground rules, he may be asked to have a time-out on the bench during recess. All major playground infractions, such as physical fighting, will be referred to the Dean. Middle Form

Philosophy of Middle Form Discipline The goals and criteria of Sacred Heart remind us that every student is a child of God and, therefore, possesses created worth, dignity and a vocation. All discipline at Stuart Hall for Boys is grounded in the dignity of each child and a fundamental understanding that discipline is not primarily punitive in nature, but educational. Students are taught that a consequence follows every choice we make, and when we choose an action, we must then take responsibility for the consequence. Choices that

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have negative consequences are opportunities to learn and grow. Disciplinary actions are always an attempt to facilitate such learning. The middle form employs a referral system that is intended to give classroom teachers more control over their individual classroom discipline. It is a process in which an individual teacher may: ? Give consequences (consistent with school policy) for disciplinary problems within the classroom. Teachers will make an attempt to use “reparation” where appropriate without making service a punishment. ? Make a written referral to the dean which in some cases would merit a Friday detention, a conference with the student and his advisor, a conference with parents, student and advisor, disciplinary probation or suspension. Advisors will receive a copy of all disciplinary referrals and will be expected to conference with the student. A copy of all written referrals will be sent home to parents regardless of other consequences. A copy of the referral will remain in the student’s school file for one academic year. In cases where a student received two disciplinary referrals in a quarter, he and his parents would be notified that the next referral would result in an “in school suspension.” Should a student receive more than three referrals in one quarter, he would be placed on disciplinary probation. ? In cases where a student receives two disciplinary referrals in a quarter he and his parents would be notified that the next referral would result in a school suspension. Should a student receive more than three referrals in one quarter, he will be placed on disciplinary probation. When a student is suspended parents receive a written and verbal notice from the school outlining the reasons for suspension and the terms of the suspension. Students can be suspended for one to three-days depending on the incident. During the suspension all academic assignments are voided for the student and 0's are recorded in the student's grade average. A teacher may send a student to the dean for a conference without a written referral. ? Bring a student up for review at the middle form advisory meeting for action through the child study team. ? Some disciplinary referrals may result in a student being referred to the school counselor for appropriate intervention, for example conflict resolution Disputes regarding disciplinary notices should first be taken up with the teacher or administrator who signs the referral note. Disciplinary referrals are given by teachers and administrators when a student chooses not to follow the guidelines of appropriate behavior in the classroom and on school grounds. Such offenses as blatant disregard for classroom rules or using inappropriate language are examples of a violation of school guidelines and will result in a Friday detention for ninety minutes. More serious offenses such as physical or verbal harassment, theft or damage of property, cheating and plagiarism, and continual repetition of minor offenses will result in a loss of extra-curricular privileges for one week. This includes the loss of participation in all Stuart Hall athletic activities. ?

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Advisory The National Association of Middle Schools reports that a teacher-student advisory program is almost universally recommended as an essential component of a true middle school. It symbolizes that place where the student is both anchored and free. An advisory can be defined as “ an organizational structure in which one small group of students identifies with and belongs to one educator, who nurtures, advocates for and shepherds through school the individuals in that group.” The advisory also provides a place for the student to belong, meet needs of affiliation, and gain a sense of power. Advisory is cross-graded -- comprised of students in grades five through eight. As a general rule, a student remains with his advisor throughout middle form. Presently, advisory meets once a week. Advisory periods take on the personality of the individual advisor. Although there are general guidelines for and expectations of our advisory program, the individual advisor has most influence on the way time is spent during the advisory period. An advisor is an advocate for the student with other teachers and administrators. An advisor will generally have a broader perspective on a student’s performance than an individual subject teacher. Parents are urged to contact advisors with any issues and concerns they might have concerning their child. Uniform Description Regular Uniform: 5-8 Non- cargo khaki pants, tucked-in white short sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest, navy v-neck sweater, dark socks, belt, low-top black or brown shoes (e.g. Oxford, loafer, rubber soled shoes) or athletic shoes (black or white/ or black & white ) with white socks. Dress Uniform: 5-8 gray pants, white Oxford button-down shirt, navy blazer with crest, dark ankle socks, dark belt, brown or black dress shoe 5-7 8th Stuart Hall stripe tie Red tie with Stuart Hall gold lions

If a middle form boy does not wear dress uniform on the appointed day, he will be required to wear his dress uniform on the day following. All dress uniform days are published on a special dress uniform calendar that is mailed to parents at the beginning of the school year. Any changes to the dress uniform calendar will be announced in Thursday notes. T-shirts: Only plain white t-shirts may be worn under uniform shirts. Optional Wear: All boys have the option of wearing a white, long sleeve polo shirt with embroidered Stuart Hall crest on non-dress uniform days. Boys may also wear a Stuart Hall crew neck sweatshirt (without hood) or a navy Stuart Hall fleece jacket (with school name written on it).

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Not Permitted: Sweatshirts with hoods (except the traditional 8th grade class sweatshirt), sweat pants, turtle necks, shirts without the Stuart Hall crest Physical Education Uniform: 3-8 Stuart Hall red and gray/ white reversible physical education shirt, change of pants (.e.g. shorts, or sweatpants – only for physical education) Free Dress: Occasionally, the students have free dress days. They are notified of these days in advance, usually at Thursday morning assembly. Students are reminded that their free dress is expected to be in good taste and consistent with the values of Stuart Hall. At all times, free dress should be simple and age-appropriate Examinations (Grades 5-8) End of the quarter or semester examinations may be given at the end of the school year to students in grades 5 through 8. Exams will be given during the regular academic day and schedule and will count no more than 10% of the student’s grade. No more than 2 exams or 1 quiz will be given during a school day. Report Cards Students in grades 5-8 receive report cards four times a year: in November (midsemester assessment), January (semester I averages), March (mid-semester assessment) and June (semester II averages). The middle form operates on a two semester marking period with mid-semester assessments which provide parents and students information about how the student is doing at the midpoint of the term. Information on these report cards includes academic, effort, & citizenship grades and the grade-point average (Grades 6-8), as well as absence and tardy information. Errors may occur in the reporting process. Please call the school office if you note discrepancies on the report card. Lower form students also follow a quarterly system of reporting. In the November report, teachers and parents meet for a conference when information is exchanged orally. In January, teachers write narrative reports and mail these to parents. In March, parent and teachers meet for conferences. This is a mid-semester update. In June, teachers write a final narrative for parents. Lower form does not issue achievement grades. Academic Probation Students in grades 5-8 who have a semester grade point average lower than 2.0 (C) will be placed on academic probation for the subsequent semester. It is during this time that student, parent, teachers, and administration design a program to assist the student in improving his marks. Because this is a serious matter, it may also mean that a student’s re-enrollment contract may be held until the student makes the desired improvement. Notice of Suspension When a student is suspended (in school suspension or out of school suspension), parents receive a written and verbal notice from the school outlining the reasons for suspension and the terms of the suspension. Also in the event of a suspension parents
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and the student will be asked to meet with the administration to discuss the incident and develop a plan for the future. Disciplinary Probation When other forms of referrals or disciplinary actions have failed to bring about a positive change in a student’s attitude or behavior, he may be placed on disciplinary probation by the Head of School. The terms of probation will be outlined specifically in writing and will be agreed upon by the administration and parents. Students not responding to the terms of disciplinary probation are subject to expulsion from school. School Safety Of primary importance in our disciplinary procedure is a belief that Stuart Hall for Boys must be a safe place for everyone. Students are educated to expect a safe environment for the physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. Threats or perceived threats to another’s safety are treated as a significant disciplinary offense. (See Serious Allegations, below, and Disciplinary Probation, above ) Serious Allegations Stuart Hall has adopted the following protocol in investigating allegations that suggest that a student may be harmful to himself or to others: 1. Meet with the student who may have made a threat or comment. 2. Contact the parents if the School believes there may be something substantive in the allegation(s). 3. Ask that the student remain off campus until the School can satisfactorily answer the allegation(s). 4. Continue to work with the school community in understanding that talk of any violence is of a very serious nature. When such an incident occurs, it is critical that all understand that no one is being accused of any misbehavior. This procedure is cautionary. It is designed to ensure that all children are safe and secure in our school and on our campus. Bullying The Goals and Criteria make clear the dignity and worth of every person. As such, bullying strikes at the basis of Sacred Heart life. It is the responsibility of the administration and the faculty to create a safe school environment – physical, intellectual, spiritual, social, and emotional safety. The School defines bullying as the misuse of power, position, or privilege and that it is done to intimidate, coerce, engender fear, and to control. In addition, it observes three main parameters of bullying: it is repetitive (prolonged over time); it involves an imbalance of power; it may be verbal, physical, social, or psychological. Bullying that takes place in cyberspace e.g. cell phones, email, instant messaging, etc. falls under a violation of our school policies and will be dealt with in the same way as other forms of bullying. Stuart Hall has outlined the following protocol in responding to allegations of bullying:
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1. Investigate the matter. 2. If bullying is occurring, parents of both the victim and the bully(ies) may be informed. 3. Parents and students will meet with the dean and the Head of Stuart Hall. 4. Suspension may follow. 5. If, after that, the situation does not correct itself, a bully may be put on behavioral probation or may be expelled from school. There are clear steps parents can take if they suspect a child is being bullied: 1. Watch for signs of distress in your son. 2. Inform your son’s teacher, advisor, or dean. 3. Advise your son to confide in a trusted teacher, administrator, or the counselor. 4. Assure your son that there is nothing wrong with him. 5. Discourage your son from retaliation. 6. Schedule a meeting with the dean or Head of Stuart Hall.

Athletic Handbook (Middle Form)

This handbook has been prepared to assist parents and students in understanding essential information about the athletic program offered at Stuart Hall for boys, in relation to the goals and criteria of the sacred heart network highlighted below. Athletic Philosophy In order for a healthy, competitive experience for our students-athletes, we strive to provide a positive atmosphere of sportsmanship and learning, both at practice sessions and at athletic events. We believe in the idea of muscular Christianity as a vehicle to reinforce and develop positive character traits in preparation for the boy’s growth into the adult world. Honoring the game, teammates and officials is a priority for our athletes and coaches at all times. Participation in the Stuart Hall athletic program provides the opportunity to live out the goals and criteria of the network of the sacred heart schools, which fosters the balance in education between academics and extracurricular life. Because of this each student is encouraged to make athletics part of his life and strive for excellence while making a commitment to his team members, coaches and community. Each boy will be given the opportunity to compete at any activity offered and will be placed into an athletic environment that will help that student benefit most from the experience. Student athletes are taught using the fundamentals of each sport and the rules of the game. Athletic Program breakdown
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Different activities are offered during three coinciding athletic seasons: fall, winter and spring. Activities are offered to all boys in the grades the sport is available. Stuart Hall athletic teams compete in the Bay Area Interscholastic Athletic League (BAIAL), Catholic Youth Organization (CYO), the San Francisco Schools and Parishes Baseball League (SFSPBL) and the Northern California Junior Lacrosse Association (NCJLA). BAIAL BAIAL: Independent School League is a competitive league. Tryouts are held for these teams, but not all boys are guaranteed a position on the team and players are not guaranteed a certain amount of playing time. CYO Participation is the focus of the CYO: Catholic Youth Organization League. Every player is guaranteed time on the court. If there are too many participants for one team, another (or more) will be formed so that all can play. Teams are divided according to skill level so that they can compete against other teams in the league. Team composition is made so to place the boys in an athletic environment the will best suit their development and experience.

Stuart Hall Fall Athletic program The fall season runs from the start of September through to the middle of November Soccer-BAIAL and CYO Cross-country-BAIAL 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th 6th, 7th, and 8th

Stuart Hall Winter Athletic program The winter season runs from the middle of November through to end of February Basketball-BAIAL and CYO 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th

Stuart Hall Spring Athletic Program The spring season runs from February to beginning of June. Baseball, SFSPBL and BAIAL Lacrosse, NCJLA Golf, Non-competitive Club 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th 6th, 7th, and 8th 6th, 7th, and 8th (one club with CES)

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TEAM SELECTION AND PARTICIPATION Competitive after school sports begin in the fifth grade. Participation is voluntary and highly encouraged. The athletic department supports a general no-cut policy. Additional teams will be added each season as numbers dictate. Team selection is based on: ? ? ? ? Practices (evaluation/try-outs) before the start of the season. Performance in physical education class in relation to that particular sport. Experience on teams in previous years. The selection of players for BAIAL and CYO is done jointly by the Athletic Director, the physical education teachers, and the individual coaches. In selecting Teams, SHB has the option of grade level or mixed grade level teams if the situation merits it. GAMES AND PRACTICES Signing up for a sporting activity at SHB means that the students, as well as their parents, have made a commitment to that sport and are expected to make every effort possible to fulfill the team obligations. Game schedules will be provided for the students and parents as soon as the League releases them. All efforts will be made to adhere to these schedules, but due to the number of teams and gym/field availability, schedule changes may occur. Additional practice games and tournaments may be added to the schedule. Coaches will make every effort to adhere to the schedule. If a coach is sick or has an unexpected emergency, all efforts will be made to get a substitute coach for that day. When games or practices are affected by weather conditions, the Recreational & Park Department will make field condition determinations by 1:30pm daily, as needed. Should a game or practice be canceled because of weather, The Director of Athletics will leave a message on his phone, 292-3105. COMMITMENT When a student joins a team, he has a responsibility to his teammates and to the school to play that sport for the entire season (season start and finish dates are highlighted above). Player's who miss games or practices, or have serious discipline issues may lose the privilege to participate. It is the student's responsibility to inform his coaches and the Athletic Director well before missing a practice or game. Excuses must be made in writing. Communication through a friend is not acceptable. A student who does not attend a game and has not given prior written notice may be suspended for one game (unless illness or a family emergency precluded him from doing so). Failure to attend a second game without written notice may result in dismissal from the team. We encourage students to participate in other outside sports or activities. However, a commitment to SHB sporting activities takes precedence over other outside activities. Parents and students need to determine before the season begins, if participating in more than one activity is possible. The Athletic Director can usually help determine what may or may not be possible. Boys should be available to both practice and play in competitive games of each athletic season.

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PLAYER CONDUCT Sportsmanship and honoring the game are very important components of Stuart Hall Athletics. Emphasis is placed on respect of teammates, coaches, referees, and the opposing team. During and after games all players need to behave in a respectful manner regardless of the result. Fair and honest play will be expected and any decision made by the referee or umpire should be accepted in a graceful manner. After a game, regardless of the outcome, opposing team members should be congratulated and thanked. PARENTS Stuart Hall teams have a designated team parent who assists the coach/team with communication and organization. All parents of team members have the opportunity for some team duties such as bringing snacks or refreshments to the games. The team parent usually organizes this for the coach. Parents are welcome and encouraged to attend the games. Parent communication Appropriate issues for parents to discuss with coaches: 1. The treatment of your child, mentally and physically. 2. Ways to help your child improve. 3. Concerns about your child's behavior. Inappropriate issues for parents to discuss with coaches: 1. Playing time. 2. Strategy. 3. Play calling. 4. Other student-athletes. If any issues are not resolved when talking to a coach, a parent may talk to the Athletic Director. The Role of Parents in Athletics Parents of athletes at Stuart Hall are expected to support and encourage in positive ways at all times. The role of the parent is very important if your child is to have a positive experience while taking part in athletics. ? Always be supportive of your child by giving encouragement and showing an interest in his team. Positive reinforcement encourages learning and fun. Research

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has shown that a ratio of 5 positive statements for each negative statement is ideal for helping young athletes do their best. ? Attend games whenever possible. If you cannot attend, ask how your child did, not whether the team won or lost. Be a positive role model by displaying good sportsmanship at all times to coaches, officials, opponents and your son's teammates. Always honor the game as a spectator. Let your son set his own goals and play the game for himself. Let the coach coach. Refrain from giving your child advice when he is playing. Use positive reinforcement with your son's coach. Let the coach know when he or she is going a good job. Respect the decisions of the referee or umpire. Read the rulebook. A full understanding of the rules will help you to enjoy the game and educate others.

?

? ?

? ?

COACHES Coaches are very much aware of their obligations and responsibilities as extremely visible representatives of Stuart Hall. Each coach is given a Stuart Hall coach’s handbook, which highlights the details and expectations of coaches. Each coach is expected to honor the game (just the same as players or parents) and be a positive role model to players. The role of the coach
?

The coach should be a positive motivator and should not use fear, intimidation or shame during coaching. The coach should treat all athletes with respect regardless of how they perform. The coach should focus on mastery rather than victory, which he sees as a byproduct of the pursuit of excellence. The coach should encourage an environment in which players are willing to risk making a mistake. Mistakes are an important and inevitable part of learning and should not be feared. The coach should respect their opponents recognizing that a worthy opponent will push their team to do their best.

? ?

?

?

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?

The coach should demonstrate personal integrity and would rather lose than win by dishonoring the game.

Communication in Athletics For the athletics program to be successful, various members of the school must be in good communication. Ultimate responsibility for the program is that of the Athletics Director. Once boys are assigned to the team, the key communication comes form the coach to his/her players. Team parents are also available to assist in communicating schedules, team expectations, changes, etc. If a player or a parent has a concern, it is best for the student to communicate directly to the coach. If that proves ineffective, it is critical that the parent should contact the athletic director. In Summation Many would agree that one of the best classrooms for life’s myriad of lessons and authentic character building happen in practices and on the playing field. While skill development and winning are intrinsic parts of any good athletic program, what distinguishes the Stuart Hall program from others is its deep and abiding commitment to character formation on and off the field. One last thing that each of us must remember is that we are a K through 8 school and the boys are, in fact children. With that in mind, having fun, learning various sports, developing character and sportsmanship can be enjoyable. Let us not bring the tensions and disappointments we see at the professional or even collegiate levels.

Athletic Calendar for Stuart Hall for Boys 2009-2010 Fall Sports Cross-country ? 6 organized meets during the season and 2/3 practices per week. Boys are able to take part in cross-country and soccer if they so choose. If they decide to do soccer they will need to attend 1/2 practices for cross-country per week. Start date: First week back at school in September End date: Final meet will take place last week in October Practice schedule sent out second week of June

? ? ?

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? Soccer ? ? ? ? ? ?

Meet schedule sent out second week of June

2 practices per week plus games (weekdays and Saturdays) Start Date: First week back at school in September End Date: Second week in November Practice schedule sent out last week of August Game schedule for BAIAL league sent out first week of June Game schedule for CYO league sent out first week of September

Winter Sports Basketball ? ? ? 2 practices per week plus games (weekdays and weekends) Start Date: Third week in November End Date: Third week in February (playoffs may run into winter break)

*Please note that there will not be any games scheduled during the weekend closest to Christmas and New Year. Games will start up again the first week in January. ? Practice schedule sent out third week in November ? ? Game schedule for BAIAL sent out first week of November Game schedule for CYO sent out last week of November

Spring Sports Lacrosse 2 practices per week plus games (weekdays and weekends) Start Date: Second week of February End Date: Third week of May

? ? ?

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? ?

Game schedule sent out last week of January Practice schedule sent out last week of January

Baseball ? ? ? ? ? 2 practices per week plus games (weekdays and weekends) Start Date: last week of February End Date: First week of June Game schedule for BAIAL sent out last week of January Game schedule for SFPSBL sent out second week of February

Club Golf ? ? ? ? 1 practice per week at the Presidio driving range Start Date: First week of March End Date: Last week of May Practice schedule sent out last week of January

V.

Shared Programs of Schools of the Sacred Heart The Ellen Hoffman, RSCJ Library

The Sister Ellen Hoffman Library is located on the first floor of the Grant Building and is used by faculties and students of both elementary schools. Library hours are: Mondays through Thursdays: 7:30-6, and Fridays: 7:30-3. Materials available in the library include books, magazines, filmstrips, videotapes, videodiscs, CD-ROMS, electronic resources and reference materials. Circulation policies: Kindergarten students may check out one book at a time beginning after Christmas vacation. First and second grade students may check out 2-3 books at a time. Third grade and up students may have up to 10 books out at a time, but may not have more than 5 books overdue. Parents are encouraged to obtain their own library numbers and to feel free to use our library facility. We also have reference books which have an overnight check out, and a 3-day reserve check out for special class projects. All books are due on Fridays, 15-21 days after check out. The Hoffman Library does not charge
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fines for late books. Overdue notices are sent to students via their teachers each week. Students are asked to follow up on these as soon as possible. Bills are sent out for lost books at the end of each semester (December and June). There is a $20.00 replacement fee for each lost book. Information Literacy Curriculum: Kindergarten through third grade classes come to the library weekly during an assigned time. Fourth through eighth grade classes come every other week or on an asneeded basis. The Hoffman Library has an information literacy curriculum which is followed in each grade throughout the school year. Kindergarten library visits consist of story time and book check out. First through third grade visits consist of story times, information literacy skills, book check out and research as needed. Fourth through eighth grade visits consist of information literacy skills and research as needed, Student expectations: The Hoffman Library has certain expectations of the students who use our materials and facility. They are as follows: 1. We expect students to follow the Sacred Heart goals. 2. No eating or drinking is allowed in Hoffman Library at any time, including gum, candy or other snacks. 3. We ask that students respect others by using a quiet voice in the library. 4. We ask that students always walk while in the library. 5. We ask that students treat library materials with care. After School Program in the Library: The library is open from 3:30-6. A librarian is on staff until 4 PM, and students in grades 3-4 may be in the library after school until 4 PM only. From 4-6 PM, the library is run by a Middle form After School Program employee. Students in grades 5-8 may stay in the library until 6 PM. The library is intended to be a quiet study and research area after school. Socializing must be done in other supervised areas. The rules for library use are in place after school also. For more information about the Middle Form After School Program, please call Luther Cuffy at 292- 3154. Birthday and Gift Book Program: The Birthday Book Program in Hoffman Library is a way to honor your child's special day. During the month of a student's birthday, he will receive a birthday card from the library, designed by a student. (Summer birthday cards are distributed before the end of the school year). Once you receive the card, you may donate a book to the library in your child's name. There is a selection of books in the library ranging in price from $15-$25 from which to choose. Once the book has been chosen and paid for, the library staff will place a book plate with your child's name on it in the book. He will be the first to check out the book, and will also receive a book bag as a gift. Gift books may also be given to mark other occasions, including anniversaries, graduations, or as a memorial. Every contribution will be noted in the Schools of the Sacred Heart annual report. If you have questions about the Birthday and Gift Book Program, please call the library staff at 292-3156.

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After School and Extension Lower form students may enroll in the Extension or After School program, which is supported by both CES and Stuart Hall. This program has its own director and faculty. Information is available through the After School office. Middle form students have the opportunity to participate in the middle form After School Program. Within the After School Program, there are no in and out privileges. Once students sign into the program, they must remain on campus until they are picked up by a parent or guardian. Any Student on campus, and not otherwise involved in a school sanctioned activity MUST sign in to the Program with the After School Staff by 3:30 daily (2:30 Friday) at one of the following locations: Unkefer Computer Lab Hoffman Library Syufy Court Herbert Center 3:30 – 5:00 PM 3:30 – 6:00 PM 3:30 – 6:00 PM 3:30 – 6:00 PM (only for games)

Because the school buildings are locked at 6:00, the School asks that Parents note carefully dismissal times for sports, rehearsals, and after school classes.

The Unkefer Technology Lab The Unkefer Technology Lab provides an environment in which students, teachers, librarians, and computer educators collaborate in a “curricular planning partnership.” Projects are designed to support and enrich the classroom curriculum and to have students explore a variety of hardware, software applications, and telecommunications media. The Lab is staffed and available for students to complete assignments from 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM Monday – Thursday, and from 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM on Friday. Hardware, software, and curricular changes keep the program alive and in a constant state of healthy flux. The Internet is a tremendous resource for children and staff and connects them to the rest of the world. BroadwayNet gives account holders an email account and access to the information on the Internet. At the same time, the school recognizes that the Internet can provide access to some material that may be inappropriate, offensive, or obscene. Goal V invites us to “personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom ” thus, BroadwayNet users have the responsibility to respect and protect the rights of every user in the community. Account holders are expected to act in a responsible, ethical, and legal manner in accordance with the Schools of the Sacred Heart goals, mission, and philosophy . All users – adults and children – sign a written agreement that they will abide by the Code of Conduct of BroadwayNet. Offenses, such as: ? using the network for any illegal activity, including violation of copyright or other contracts, or plagiarism ? degrading or disrupting equipment or system performance ? vandalizing the data of another user ? wastefully using finite resources

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? ? ? ? ?

gaining unauthorized access to resources or entities invading the privacy of individuals using an account owned by another user posting personal communications without the author’s consent posting anonymous messages may involve having a user’s account suspended or lost for an academic year.

VI.

Health and Safety

The office is equipped with first aid supplies and is used as an emergency center to give care in case of accident or sudden illness at school. The office is not a clinic or treatment center. Children who are ill will be sent home after contact with parents or other persons identified on the student’s emergency card. It is important for parents to keep emergency cards accurate. A Student Medication Form is required for all students needing medication during the day. The school office issues these forms and is also responsible for keeping and dispensing the medications for which parents have given their singed permission. It is of great benefit for the School to know of any sudden, chronic, or communicable diseases contracted by the children. They may include chicken pox, measles, conjunctivitis, or head lice. Head Lice Head lice cases are relatively common and a nuisance, though not a health hazard. Stuart Hall for Boys has a no lice and no nit’s policy. Your son will have to go home should lice or nits be discovered in his hair. Since transmission among a group of children occurs quite easily, it is imperative that you notify the school immediately should you be the person to discover lice or nits in his hair. Upon receiving this information the school office will send home a Head Lice Notification form to the parents of all children in your sons grade. This form requests that all parents check their son’s head and sign and return the form to the school the next day. Participation of 100% of parents is essential! The school will follow-up with a headcheck of the entire grade and siblings of those in the grade, and CES will be notified for siblings in their school. ? About Head Lice: o Head lice – parasitic insects that live on the head. A louse becomes capable of laying eggs in approximately seven days and is considered an adult. Adult head lice are grey or brown wingless insects approximately 1/8 inch in length. They are difficult to find as they scurry on a child’s head. Adult females lay eggs (nits) by gluing them to hair near the base. Lice are passed from head to head, head to hairbrush to head, head to clothing to head. They do not fly or jump. o Nits – If your child has nits this means that your child has had head lice even if you have been unable to locate the insect(s). Head lice eggs take

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seven to ten days to hatch. Nits are firmly attached to hair shafts, quite small (a speck), and usually yellow to white. You cannot “flick” a nit off of the hair. This is one way of distinguishing between a fleck of dry scalp and a nit. ? The Department of Public Health recommends a combination of treatment and nit removal. 1. Treatment “The current product of choice is permethrin (i.e. Nix). There is no conclusive scientific evidence to support the use of products such as vinegar, isopropyl alcohol, enzyme-based compounds, tea tree oil, or other alternative products advertised to dissolve the glue on the nits or kill the nits. Similarly there are no conclusive scientific data to support claims that mayonnaise, olive oil, melted butter, petroleum jelly or other current commercial products on the hair suffocate the nits and lice” 2. Nit Removal Use a fine-toothed metal nit comb to remove the nits. Flea combs (from pet stores) also work well. Continue to check for nits / lice daily as remaining nits may not have been killed by the treatment and can hatch seven to ten days later. ???You may wish to discuss the Department of Public Health recommendations with your pediatrician. The School will conduct head lice checks of all K-4 students at the beginning of school, and after each vacation period: Thanksgiving, Christmas, Winter Break, and Easter. We have a list of experienced “head checkers” who will be called upon to volunteer to conduct scheduled or unplanned checks of students. It is our desire to enlarge this list. Parents wishing to assist with this program should contact the school office or Michelle Keene who chairs our SHB class parents.

VII.

Emergency Guidelines

The information on the emergency card is important to your child's safety and welfare. It is understood that the instructions given will remain in force until revoked by the parent or guardian. Additional cards will be available at the school when need for revision. It is suggested that parents keep a memorandum of the information on the card. A. Illness or Accident 1. In cases which appear to be of minor nature, first-aid will be administered at the school. Medication may not be administered without a completed Waiver and Release From Liability form.

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2. In cases which are apparently serious, the School will make every effort to carry out parents' instructions. 3. Parents who file Exemption Cards are asked to give directions to be followed in the event of an emergency. 4. Parents will be expected to make provision for taking a sick child home. The School does not have facilities for transporting children nor facilities for caring for children who are ill. 5. If the home does not supply adequate instruction, or if the instructions given cannot be followed at the time of an emergency, the school authorities will act according to their best judgment for the health and well-being of the child. B. Leaving the School Premises: 1. Children must never leave the building/campus without permission from school authorities. 2. Parents should not take children from the school yard or other areas without notifying the school office. 3. The school will not permit children to leave campus in a taxicab sent by parents. Parents who intend to send taxicabs for their children must notify the School in writing in advance of the planned departure or have a permanent request on file in the school office. 4. Parents or guardians should not send persons whose names are not on the emergency card for release unless such persons are identified by prior telephone call and written instructions. C. Telephone Messages for Children 1. Parents are asked not to telephone the school office asking that children be directed to various places after school. Such requests must be written and given to the child's teacher at the beginning of the day. 2. The School will not accept a telephone request to call a taxicab for a child. D. Earthquake/Crisis Release Plan (See Below) 1. Pick-up point will be the front lawn at 2222 Broadway. School employees responsible for release will be identified in bright yellow vests. 2. (ID) Identification must be presented before a child will be released. 3. Students remaining on campus after 24 hours will be relocated. Relocation information will be posted on the front doors of the Flood Mansion (2222 Broadway).

EMERGENCY PROCEDURE IN EVENT OF SCHOOL CLOSURE In the unlikely event that the school must close due to an emergency, we have established the following procedure: 1. Students and employees will gather in the safest place, most likely on Broadway in front of the Flood Mansion or in their respective schools. Stuart Hall High School students and employees will gather on Octavia St. in front of school or in a safe area of the school building.
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2. All families will be contacted by phone by a representative from the Parents’ Association. 3. No student will be allowed to leave campus unless one of these three criteria are met: ? the student's parent comes to pick her/him up and signs off with a designated School representative. ? the parent gives explicit permission on the school emergency card for their child to go home by another method. ? the parent authorizes the student to go home by another method, through a phone conversation with a School representative. 4. In the event that phone service is interrupted and the School is unable to make contact by phone, no student will be allowed to leave unless picked up in person by an authorized adult. 5. The School has sufficient supplies on hand to take care of basic needs for 24 hours.
Please contact these Administrators if you have any questions or concerns: Convent of the Sacred Heart Elementary School Anne Wachter, rscj Office ………………………………………. 415-292-3136 Stuart Hall for Boys Jaime Dominguez Office ………………………………………. 415-292-3144 Convent of the Sacred Heart High School Office ………………………………………. Stuart Hall High School Office ………………………………………. Doug Grant 415-292-3122 Gordon Sharafinski 415-345-5811

Our primary concern is the safety of our community, and to that end we have the structures in place to keep us confident, secure and prepared.

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Index Absences ....................................................9 Academic Honors ...................................20 Academic Probation ...............................29 Academic Program .................................13 Accreditation .............................................4 Achievement Grades ..............................17 Advisory (Middle Form) .......................27 After School and Extension ...................39 After School Program in the Library ...38 Athletics …………………………….…..30 Attendance.................................................8 Birthday and Gift Book Program .........39 Birthdays ..................................................11 Books and Materials ...............................14 Cafeteria Rules: .......................................25 Child Study Team (CST)........................21 Circulation policies.................................38 Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities...............................................21 Communications and Electronic Devices ................................................................13 Community Service ................................10 Conferences .............................................21 Contracts ....................................................7 Destination Imagination ........................21 Disciplinary Probation ...........................29 Earthquake Crisis Plan…………………...43 E.R.B.s .......................................................21 Emergency Guidelines ...........................42 Examinations (Grades 7-8) ....................28 Explorations.............................................23 Extended Vacations ..................................9 Faculty and Administration ....................2 Financial Aid .............................................7 Goals and Criteria.....................................6 Handbook Changes ................................13 Health and Safety ...................................40 Home Assignments ................................14 Homerooms, Curriculum, and Schedules..............................................13 Homework Club .....................................20 House and Baby Sitting .........................11 General Policies.........................................7 Information Literacy Curriculum.........38 Illness or Accident ..................................42
Student, Parent Handbook 2010-2011

Leaving the School Premises ……………42 Lice ………………..…………………….40 Lockers, Desks, and Cubbies ................12 Lost and Found .......................................12 Lunch........................................................12 Make Up Work........................................11 Mission and Philosophy ..........................0 Mutual Respect .........................................7 Notice of Suspension..............................29 One-Month Notices ................................20 Originality of One’s Work .....................17 Parent Absences......................................12 Parent-School Partnership.......................6 Philosophy of Education .........................6 Philosophy of Lower Form Discipline.25 Philosophy of Middle Form Discipline26 Playground Rules: ..................................25 Procedures for Requesting Excused Extended Absences ...............................9 Promotion and Graduation Requirements.......................................23 Proposals for Community Service Projects..................................................10 Religious Heritage ....................................4 Reports .....................................................28 School Counselor ....................................22 School Organization .................................4 School Safety ...........................................29 Secondary School Placement ................23 Shared Programs of Schools of the Sacred Heart ........................................38 Student Council ......................................14 Study Notices ..........................................20 Tardiness....................................................9 Telephone messages for Children …….…42 The Ellen Hoffman, RSCJ Library ........38 The Society of the Sacred Heart..............3 The Unkefer Technology Lab................39 Toys, Weapons, or the Appearance Thereof..................................................13 Traditions...................................................5 Tutoring ...................................................22 Uniform (Lower Form) ..........................24 Uniform (Middle Form).........................23 Visitors and Guests.................................11

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Student-Parent Handbook 2010-2011


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